1. image: Download

    A Place to Bury Strangers by Matt Dunn, July 26th at Rock and Roll Hotel

    A Place to Bury Strangers by Matt Dunn, July 26th at Rock and Roll Hotel

     
  2. "Heart" is the last installment in America Hearts’ monthly digital singles series (for maximum sadness, stream all the singles on SoundCloud).

    Read Ramon Ramirez’s take on the above clip for “Heart,” and catch America Hearts tonight at Black Cat with Olivia Mancini & The Mates,The Mean Season, and We Fought the Big One DJs (8 p.m., $8).

     
  3. image: Download

    Mike Hicks took some photos of Mucca Pazza at 9:30 Club. See the slideshow here.

    Mike Hicks took some photos of Mucca Pazza at 9:30 Club. See the slideshow here.

     
  4. image: Download

    This spring, a 32-year-old dude from Brookland named Dave Mann convinced 125 bands to play the inaugural Sweet Tea Pumpkin Pie Festival for free. It was so fun he’s about to do it again.
The second Sweet Tea Pumpkin Pie is this weekend. And Mann is on our cover this week! Read the story, see you at the shows.
Photo by Darrow Montgomery

    This spring, a 32-year-old dude from Brookland named Dave Mann convinced 125 bands to play the inaugural Sweet Tea Pumpkin Pie Festival for free. It was so fun he’s about to do it again.

    The second Sweet Tea Pumpkin Pie is this weekend. And Mann is on our cover this week! Read the story, see you at the shows.

    Photo by Darrow Montgomery

     
  5. image: Download

    Where Am I Rocking? The D.C. Rock Venue Decision Tree!
It’s a confusing time to be a D.C. concert-goer. The Fillmore Silver  Spring has invaded the established order. DIY spaces flicker and fade  like so many lightning bugs. Perhaps you’ve had one too many drinks. If  you find yourself at a rock concert and you can’t remember where exactly  you are, this might help.—Sadie Dingfelder

    Where Am I Rocking? The D.C. Rock Venue Decision Tree!

    It’s a confusing time to be a D.C. concert-goer. The Fillmore Silver Spring has invaded the established order. DIY spaces flicker and fade like so many lightning bugs. Perhaps you’ve had one too many drinks. If you find yourself at a rock concert and you can’t remember where exactly you are, this might help.—Sadie Dingfelder

     
  6.  
  7. WHAT TO DO TONIGHT:Kassav’ is to zouk music what Louis Armstrong is to jazz, the Carter Family is to country, and Chuck Berry is to rock & roll. Created in the late 1970s, zouk is a mash-up of carnival-borne rhythms, initially from Guadeloupe, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic. Now, it incorporates pan-Caribbean influences, from reggae to salsa, in large part due to Kassav’. For more than 30 years, the Paris-based group has been the genre’s key band, constantly pushing zouk’s musical boundaries while repping the French West Indies through creole lyrics. Kassav’s concerts feel like the carnivals from which its rhythms evolved—loud, spirited bacchanals. But just as the artistry of Armstrong, the Carters, and Berry elevated their styles, Kassav’s musicianship trumps that of an average party band. —Christopher PorterKassav’ performs with Rafrechi at 9 p.m. at Crossroads, 4103 Baltimore Ave., Bladensburg. $30 in advance, $35 at door. 

    WHAT TO DO TONIGHT:

    Kassav’ is to zouk music what Louis Armstrong is to jazz, the Carter Family is to country, and Chuck Berry is to rock & roll. Created in the late 1970s, zouk is a mash-up of carnival-borne rhythms, initially from Guadeloupe, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic. Now, it incorporates pan-Caribbean influences, from reggae to salsa, in large part due to Kassav’. For more than 30 years, the Paris-based group has been the genre’s key band, constantly pushing zouk’s musical boundaries while repping the French West Indies through creole lyrics. Kassav’s concerts feel like the carnivals from which its rhythms evolved—loud, spirited bacchanals. But just as the artistry of Armstrong, the Carters, and Berry elevated their styles, Kassav’s musicianship trumps that of an average party band. —Christopher Porter

    Kassav’ performs with Rafrechi at 9 p.m. at Crossroads, 4103 Baltimore Ave., Bladensburg. $30 in advance, $35 at door

     
  8. WHAT TO DO TONIGHT:Bob Dylan’s genius was, in part, due to his ability to write new songs that felt both canonical and contemporary. The same is true of Gillian Welch, whose new album, The Harrow and the Harvest, features 10 new tunes that sound plucked from country-folk history but are timeless in their beauty, simplicity, and emotional depth. It took eight years to follow up 2003’s relatively fussy Soul Journey, as Welch and her co-writer, David Rawlings, struggled to compose songs that met their standards. But all that toiling was worth the harvest. Like 2001’s Time (The Revelator), this new LP features Welch and Rawlings’ seamless harmonies along with their acoustic guitars, banjos, harmonicas, and hand-claps. But old-timey back porch music rarely sounds as ruggedly of the moment as Welch’s deep, dark poems. —Christopher PorterThe concert begins at 8 p.m. at the Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, Bethesda. $33. 

    WHAT TO DO TONIGHT:

    Bob Dylan’s genius was, in part, due to his ability to write new songs that felt both canonical and contemporary. The same is true of Gillian Welch, whose new album, The Harrow and the Harvest, features 10 new tunes that sound plucked from country-folk history but are timeless in their beauty, simplicity, and emotional depth. It took eight years to follow up 2003’s relatively fussy Soul Journey, as Welch and her co-writer, David Rawlings, struggled to compose songs that met their standards. But all that toiling was worth the harvest. Like 2001’s Time (The Revelator), this new LP features Welch and Rawlings’ seamless harmonies along with their acoustic guitars, banjos, harmonicas, and hand-claps. But old-timey back porch music rarely sounds as ruggedly of the moment as Welch’s deep, dark poems. —Christopher Porter

    The concert begins at 8 p.m. at the Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, Bethesda. $33. 

     
  9. WHAT TO DO TONIGHT:Twelve years ago, Zapp’s founding members died in an apparent murder-suicide when Larry Troutman allegedly shot his younger brother Roger Troutman, then shot himself in a car a few blocks away. There were no witnesses and no clear motive, but family members have speculated their deaths were the result of a business deal gone awry. These days, Zapp is anchored by Lester and Terry Troutman, who will bring a version of the once-influential funk act to Fort Dupont Park tonight. It will be fascinating to see how the band has soldiered on without its main innovator. One of the most recognizable aspects of Zapp’s sound was Roger Troutman’s robotic talk box, famously heard in the band’s singles “Computer Love,” “More Bounce to the Ounce,” and “Dance Floor.” If you think T-Pain invented Auto-Tune six years ago, think again: If it weren’t for Zapp, today’s pop singers might have no pitch correction to hide behind. —Marcus J. MooreZapp performs with Teri S. at 8 p.m. at Fort Dupont Park, Minnesota Avenue and Randle Circle SE. Free. 

    WHAT TO DO TONIGHT:

    Twelve years ago, Zapp’s founding members died in an apparent murder-suicide when Larry Troutman allegedly shot his younger brother Roger Troutman, then shot himself in a car a few blocks away. There were no witnesses and no clear motive, but family members have speculated their deaths were the result of a business deal gone awry. These days, Zapp is anchored by Lester and Terry Troutman, who will bring a version of the once-influential funk act to Fort Dupont Park tonight. It will be fascinating to see how the band has soldiered on without its main innovator. One of the most recognizable aspects of Zapp’s sound was Roger Troutman’s robotic talk box, famously heard in the band’s singles “Computer Love,” “More Bounce to the Ounce,” and “Dance Floor.” If you think T-Pain invented Auto-Tune six years ago, think again: If it weren’t for Zapp, today’s pop singers might have no pitch correction to hide behind. —Marcus J. Moore

    Zapp performs with Teri S. at 8 p.m. at Fort Dupont Park, Minnesota Avenue and Randle Circle SE. Free. 

     
  10. WHAT TO DO TONIGHT:A year ago, True Womanhood was loud and scuzzy, with earsplitting reverb that thrashed and ricocheted around the stage. But earlier this year, Thomas Redmond Jr. and Noam Eisner decided to go fully electronic, writing moombahton-inspired songs like “Minajah” and covering and remixing tracks by the Denver-based electronic artist Pictureplane. True Womanhood’s version of “Dark Rift” was typically gloomy, but with sharpened vocals and a reassembled beat that won the band plenty of new admirers, including Pictureplane himself, who said, “No one has ever covered my music this well before.” Now living in New York, True Womanhood comes home to open for fashionable local band U.S. Royalty. The headliner’s Morricone-tinged bucolics are a bit too reminiscent of The Killers’ Sam’s Town, but perhaps the Thornley brothers will dispense a few tips on how to dress like Rumours-era Lindsey Buckingham. —Benjamin R. FreedTrue Womanhood performs with U.S. Royalty and Birdlips at 8 p.m. at the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. NW. $15. 

    WHAT TO DO TONIGHT:

    A year ago, True Womanhood was loud and scuzzy, with earsplitting reverb that thrashed and ricocheted around the stage. But earlier this year, Thomas Redmond Jr. and Noam Eisner decided to go fully electronic, writing moombahton-inspired songs like “Minajah” and covering and remixing tracks by the Denver-based electronic artist Pictureplane. True Womanhood’s version of “Dark Rift” was typically gloomy, but with sharpened vocals and a reassembled beat that won the band plenty of new admirers, including Pictureplane himself, who said, “No one has ever covered my music this well before.” Now living in New York, True Womanhood comes home to open for fashionable local band U.S. Royalty. The headliner’s Morricone-tinged bucolics are a bit too reminiscent of The Killers’ Sam’s Town, but perhaps the Thornley brothers will dispense a few tips on how to dress like Rumours-era Lindsey Buckingham. —Benjamin R. Freed

    True Womanhood performs with U.S. Royalty and Birdlips at 8 p.m. at the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. NW. $15.